Active and Passive Projects

In the past I’ve talked about how I work Asimov Style, and my wife Katie works Bradbury Style. It’s a loose generalization of how both men approached creative projects. What I’ve realized is that I’ve fallen into a hybrid of those work styles, and that the two can be classified as active and passive projects.…

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Art and Product: Allowing Creative Work to Find Its Audience

Consumer culture pushes us to believe that commercial viability is the be-all and end-all of human creativity. Why bother writing a book if it’s not going to make you a lot of money or be turned into a blockbuster movie? What’s the point in creating a painting if you can’t sell it for several million…

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Writing Through the Gloom

Here’s a quote from another fantastic guest post on Chuck Wendig’s website. This one’s from Michael J. Martinez, and it’s about how to write while the world burns: So my own answer is to get down to it and create the adventures that my readers seem to like from my work, all while making sure…

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Worldbuilding as Afterthought

There’s a guest post up on Chuck Wendig’s website that begins as follows: I think Tolkien is one of the most toxic influences on speculative fiction.  It’s not because of his dodgy racial overtones in making all the orcs dark, degenerate Elves, or the way he pounded Tom Bombadil’s godawful Vogon poetry into our eardrums.…

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Fear the Forums – Part 3: Blink

Recap: I want to expand the audience for my books and games. Marketing is an essential function of being a writer and publisher in the 21st century. This means getting better at social media. For tabletop roleplaying games, it also includes participation in groups and forums. While this appears to be conventional wisdom, I question…

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